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Im looking at rotors and pads , what are good replacement rotors , , just stock replacement size , thanks josh
 

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BPU is so 1997
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If your stock rotors are within the runout spec, I would just resurface them and put new Hawk HPS pads on them. You really can't beat the stock braking system, short of a full $3k big brake Brembo or StopTech upgrade. You could also do braided lines for better pedal feel.
 

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^^^Good advice here. OEM brakes are hard to beat, and this is coming from a Brembo BBK guy. Stock brakes get even better, as HUA said, with stainless lines. For the street, stock pads are also hard to beat, but this is more of a personal preference issue for most guys, as most aftermarket pads can't match the initial bite of the OEM pads though they (aftermarket) may wind up with shorter stopping distances overall. Depends on what you're after.

Ken.
 

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Hua said:
You could also do braided lines for better pedal feel.
Unless the stock lines are damaged, the better pedal feel that people experience after installing braided lines is due to the good bleeding of the system that is required after opening it to install the lines. Braided lines DO NOT swell any less than a good condition "rubber" line. This comes from both my own experience, but perhaps more importantly from an engineer who works at Performance Friction in the department where they design and build the brakes for Nextel Cup cars and other race cars. He says that the ONLY "performance" advantage of braided lines is that they are a bit more resistant to being torn loose by flying road debris, etc., but that they do not swell any less or cause any more of a "spongy" pedal than regular lines in good condition.
 

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Alpine Hardtopper
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A lot of people really like the looks of a cross drilled rotor. My car came with a set on it, and while they do look nice, I don't like the tendency drilled rotors have of cracking. If you're just driving on the street they're fine, but not usually recommended for track use.

If you're looking for a set for regular street driving, the stock rotors are hard to beat. Can usually be had ~$80 for the front and ~$110 for the rears.

For slotted rotors, Rotora and Powerslot seem to have a good rep and add ~$30-50 per rotor over stock replacements.

For pads, search the archives as there was a topic not too long ago about pad recomendations. Ah, heck...here's the link:
http://www.supraforums.com/forum/showthread.php?t=257479

Pad choice is going to depend a lot more on your use and importance of bite, power, and dust.

Another good thread is this one:
http://www.supraforums.com/forum/showthread.php?s=&threadid=166068
 

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Boost Junkie said:
Unless the stock lines are damaged, the better pedal feel that people experience after installing braided lines is due to the good bleeding of the system that is required after opening it to install the lines. Braided lines DO NOT swell any less than a good condition "rubber" line. This comes from both my own experience, but perhaps more importantly from an engineer who works at Performance Friction in the department where they design and build the brakes for Nextel Cup cars and other race cars. He says that the ONLY "performance" advantage of braided lines is that they are a bit more resistant to being torn loose by flying road debris, etc., but that they do not swell any less or cause any more of a "spongy" pedal than regular lines in good condition.
i felt a much better pedal feel after installing my braided lines and i had bled my system with new fluid with the stock lines couple months ago. of course this is just my personal experience..
 

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The statement about rubber lines not having more flex (ballooning) than braided isn't necessarily correct. On an old 4x4 trail rig I built I ended up having to run two front hoses that were ~24" long. Initially I ran some 12" hoses, but had to limit articulation while waiting for the longer hoses. When I put the long hoses on, the pedal was VERY squishy. It still stopped fine, but it was very non-linear feeling. I blead the system several times thinking it was a bubble, but it was always fine. Later I replaced the 24" hoses with braided lines and it went back to normal feel.

So I think the more correct statement is that on appliations using short rubber hose for the brakes, there's not likely to be any improvement in "feel" by going to a braided hose. But as the line length increases, the braided line will start to have a notable advantage (in feel anyway).
 

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Let's go Phils
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Stock pads all the way. I used the project mu pads and they are the loudest pads ever. I use brembo oem cross drilled replacements, they are fine. But the pads suck ass.
 

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I would also go with the stock pads, I just put on some Hawks HPS's and they don't stop as well as stock. I also have the stoptech rotors which I like.
 

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This is one of the areas where results seem to vary ALOT from car to car. When I first got my car I believe it had Hawk HPS pads on it, they squeaked but they bit in really well and stayed with it the whole time.

Im back on stock pads now and I hate them. The most unusuall part is the change in the parking brake. With the aftermarket pads it was hard to pull the brake up all the way, and it locked up the wheels all the way. Now with the OEM pads, its easy as hell to pull the brake up all the way, and it doesnt lock the rears up NEAR as much.

I had the rotors machined at the same time, so this may have something to do with it. Anyone have an idea?
 

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twistedmethod333 said:
This is one of the areas where results seem to vary ALOT from car to car. When I first got my car I believe it had Hawk HPS pads on it, they squeaked but they bit in really well and stayed with it the whole time.

Im back on stock pads now and I hate them. The most unusuall part is the change in the parking brake. With the aftermarket pads it was hard to pull the brake up all the way, and it locked up the wheels all the way. Now with the OEM pads, its easy as hell to pull the brake up all the way, and it doesnt lock the rears up NEAR as much.

I had the rotors machined at the same time, so this may have something to do with it. Anyone have an idea?
i don't see how the stock pads or not would affect your parking brake because supras use an internal parking brake that looks like a drum brake assembly inside the rotor.

my old stock rubber lines were in good condition, my supra has 50k miles on it. braided lines made a big diff on my car...plus they are only like 120 bucks?
 

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Like Suprasarecool said, the parking brake is totally seperate from the rear disk brakes. When you had the rear rotors turned, the inner diameter of the parking drum was probably increased. You may take a look at adjusting the parking brake if you rely on it at all. Factory manual has instructions, but it's not too bad. IIRC, getting the rotors off is often the hardest part, and since yours were just off...no problem.

I bought a set of the Goodridge lines with my car (owner had them, but hadn't installed yet). They've been sitting on my shelf as well. I'm planning to put them on when I remove the TRAC system and have to bleed the brakes anyway.
 

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Hua said:
If your stock rotors are within the runout spec, I would just resurface them and put new Hawk HPS pads on them. You really can't beat the stock braking system, short of a full $3k big brake Brembo or StopTech upgrade. You could also do braided lines for better pedal feel.
Ditto.
I'm still running stock pads/rotors on the track. I will probably switch to HPS pads.
And I could feel some difference when I put on the braided lines. And I feel more confident in them.
 

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REVTECHRACING.COM
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KLH2004a said:
A lot of people say just go with OEM Toyota rotors, and try the TRD pads.
DITTO. tried many others and always went back to stock. cant beat the surface area of the stockers. brembo sports arent bad. stay away from the hawk pads.

i would use the brembo sports with goodridge lines and stock pads with the brembo 5.1 fluid.
 

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drift tt 23 said:
DITTO. tried many others and always went back to stock. cant beat the surface area of the stockers. brembo sports arent bad. stay away from the hawk pads.

i would use the brembo sports with goodridge lines and stock pads with the brembo 5.1 fluid.

i agree with both of you. cant beat either 1 of those setups for a street car on a mild budget.
 

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OG
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this is where alot of people get confused.

because one type of pad works great for someone, it might not be the pad for you.

the stock pads will always have better initial bite and are gonna work the best on most street cars. this is the right pad for most supra owners out there.

basically, you need to choose the correct setup for your type of driving. alot of people make the mistake of getting a really aggressive metallic racing compound.

these type of pads do brake harder, but keep in mind you sacrifice your initial bite when going to a more aggressive compound. so on a street car where you never get up to extreme temps, you just gave up all your cold friction and it will feel like you gave up most of your braking power.

the hawk hps is a good choice for more aggressive drivers. the hawk hps will have a higher coefficient of friction at higher temps during spirited driving and will slow you down faster. you just need to get them up to temperature & you will see them bite down and drag much harder than the stock pads. even the stock pads work better when hot, but only up to a point. eventually, they will begin to fade quicker than a race compound.

hope that helps out
 

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Was the 24" non-braided line a stock (OEM) line, or was it an aftermarket line?

cord4530 said:
The statement about rubber lines not having more flex (ballooning) than braided isn't necessarily correct. On an old 4x4 trail rig I built I ended up having to run two front hoses that were ~24" long. Initially I ran some 12" hoses, but had to limit articulation while waiting for the longer hoses. When I put the long hoses on, the pedal was VERY squishy.
 
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