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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all

Have got a mk3 supra that i do not drive enough as it currently has a worn bearing/diff noise which put me off


I purchased the car and it was unused for several years due to a dead fuel pump but it does seem to be in good condition engine and trans wise

So have replaced the fuel pump and the centre shaft bearing/rubber and rear trans mount

But i then noticed alot of tyre noise in the rear which it is not the tyres No grinding noises or squeaks its just "helicopter whine"

but it seems to ever so slightly coming from the left rear wheel but i cannot tell have tried it on jack stands as well as sitting in the awkward rear seat as someone drove

I still cannot pinpoint the issue it sounds like its coming from the diff / left rear wheel but can't figure it out for the life of me

Any pointers

Also if i do decide to replace wheel bearings what's the chance my hub will be chewed out ? i have removed both wheels and retorqued the big 30mm bolt holding the axle in which it already was very tight and replaced the split pin

there is NO play on the rear wheels when giving them a pull and such while jacked up hand brake off
 

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When does the noise happen? During acceleration, decceleration, all the time while movie? Most differential noises are either during one or the other, not all the time.

How are the tires? If they are old they tend to get hard and way louder. I have had a set of tires that got so noisy I thought it might be drivetrain issues?

You can jack the car up and spin the back wheels. If its making any noise you can narrow it down. Could be wheel bearing could be a brake pad dragging.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
When does the noise happen? During acceleration, decceleration, all the time while movie? Most differential noises are either during one or the other, not all the time.

How are the tires? If they are old they tend to get hard and way louder. I have had a set of tires that got so noisy I thought it might be drivetrain issues?

You can jack the car up and spin the back wheels. If its making any noise you can narrow it down. Could be wheel bearing could be a brake pad dragging.
the tires are ok did it with 3 pairs

i did the jacking up trick and still couldn't narrow it brakes are all good

it happens most of the time but slightly more in deceleration but it could be due to in those situations the exuaust is quieter

I'm just baffled as i really don't want to rebuild a diff forit to be say hard bushes is that possible?
 

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Well I would suggest reading around some more. Maybe even searching through some youtube videos to see if you can find the sound again.

All that being said whenever I hear whine I do think differential. All else fails change the oil in it. Refill it with about 50% Lucas "oil stabilizer". If its in the beginning stages of failure this stuff will buy you some time. It will also help rule it out. If you cant think of the last time it was changed then throwing $25-30 isnt such a bad idea either way. Its not fun refilling.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Well I would suggest reading around some more. Maybe even searching through some youtube videos to see if you can find the sound again.

All that being said whenever I hear whine I do think differential. All else fails change the oil in it. Refill it with about 50% Lucas "oil stabilizer". If its in the beginning stages of failure this stuff will buy you some time. It will also help rule it out. If you cant think of the last time it was changed then throwing $25-30 isnt such a bad idea either way. Its not fun refilling.
I appreciate the replies

ya ive given it so much thought watched many youtube vids and read most threads on wheel bearings

also ya have done the diff fluid change and added LSD additive to save the clutch plates

im just stumped as ive misdiagnosed diffs for wheel bearing noise before etc
 

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Really, the only way to check wheel bearings is to remove the brake caliper and, in the rear, axle shaft, then turn the hub with your bare hands. The hub needs to be alone and free so you can feel for any possible subtle lumpiness while turning the bearing. With the hub free and unloaded, it's possible to feel if it's loose at all by wiggling at 12 and 6 o'clock, and again at 9 and 3. You just can't do that with the brake and axle in the mix.

Of course, with the side axle out, you can check the CV joints for play.

The bearings aren't all that bad to change if you have a press and a strong puller for the front. The TSRM is clear on how to do it.
 

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At the shop, when applicable, we run cars in the air on the lift and listen to diff, bearings, engine noise, etc with a needle tip stethoscope. Obviously wouldn't work for the front wheels on the MKIII but the rears it would.
 

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So, here's another trick. I've tried and developed many odd ones, including duct taping my iPhone under the hood to figure out what's jiggling, driven it and honked when I could feel it. Then review "tape", see what's jiggling when the honk comes and done. Subaru bought that car back after seeing my video when the service department just magically couldn't feel the entire drivetrain shuddering. We're still friends - bought another one.

For your issue, either buy a cheap garden hose to cut up, or decide it's time to replace yours and cut it up. Run a section of hose from the diff (end pressed against the diff and held with duct tape) up into the car to the driver's seat. Go for a drive listening to it (put it right up against your ear - pressed firmly) and ignore the neighbors pointing and laughing at you listening to the hose. Gas on, gas off and you'll get a very clear audio in your head. Now, put the lower end of the hose against the inner hub area, or a suspension member as close to it (and physically connected) as you can. Be sure there is not a rubber bushing between the component you choose and the hub. Drive again. Then do the other rear hub area. You'll get a very clear audio picture of what it is. And you'll laugh and say "No way am I hearing this. Unbelievable." under your breath while driving.

A hose transmits sound eerily well. Generations of Dads (my hand is up) slid one end under the tent in the backyard at night when the kids had sleepovers, and made wolf sounds, etc, plus in the Navy they used "speaking tubes" hundreds of feet long to talk to various parts of the ship if you need references on how long mankind has known this. It works great. Extra points if you simultaneously install 3 sections of hose and drive around listening to them. The neighbors won't invite you to the annual barbecue, though.

Seriously, all humor aside I have done this with laughably easy results and I keep the cut chunks of hose coiled under the workbench. The best setup is if you can get the entire end of the hose in contact against the diff/hub/suspect component, and held firmly against it. Zip ties, duct tape, all come into play.
 

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Yup it works.
A doctor's stethoscope works the exact same way.
Simple tubes to direct the noise to your ear.

KISS - Keep It Simple Stupid
A good way to easily and simply pinpoint a suspect component in the drivetrain.

I've also done the attachment of video (GoPro) to the underside of the vehicle.
It makes diagnosing a loose or high vibration/klunky noise much easier when you can see the actual component move in a way it shouldn't.

Works good.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Yup it works.
A doctor's stethoscope works the exact same way.
Simple tubes to direct the noise to your ear.

KISS - Keep It Simple Stupid
A good way to easily and simply pinpoint a suspect component in the drivetrain.

I've also done the attachment of video (GoPro) to the underside of the vehicle.
It makes diagnosing a loose or high vibration/klunky noise much easier when you can see the actual component move in a way it shouldn't.

Works good.
i see your signature i like

just need a bit of advice even more

well i am coming to the conclusion it may be a wheel bearing

it seems taking off with a say 1/3 throttle as per normal not racing around i get the howling whine

coasting i get the howling whine and when slowing down also all the time it seems noisier when coasting cruising but even putting some throttle into it i still get the howl

if it was a diff it would do it on coast and cruise only ??

i have got a electric toy of a stehtescope coming in the post we just have lockdowns covid
 

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An old garden hose would have told you 5 days ago, and no, what you just added does not point toward a wheel bearing more. How are you planning to use the electric stethescope while you are driving?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
An old garden hose would have told you 5 days ago, and no, what you just added does not point toward a wheel bearing more. How are you planning to use the electric stethescope while you are driving?
the electric stethoscope is wireless just a simple cable tie to a control arm or something creative
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
So, here's another trick. I've tried and developed many odd ones, including duct taping my iPhone under the hood to figure out what's jiggling, driven it and honked when I could feel it. Then review "tape", see what's jiggling when the honk comes and done. Subaru bought that car back after seeing my video when the service department just magically couldn't feel the entire drivetrain shuddering. We're still friends - bought another one.

For your issue, either buy a cheap garden hose to cut up, or decide it's time to replace yours and cut it up. Run a section of hose from the diff (end pressed against the diff and held with duct tape) up into the car to the driver's seat. Go for a drive listening to it (put it right up against your ear - pressed firmly) and ignore the neighbors pointing and laughing at you listening to the hose. Gas on, gas off and you'll get a very clear audio in your head. Now, put the lower end of the hose against the inner hub area, or a suspension member as close to it (and physically connected) as you can. Be sure there is not a rubber bushing between the component you choose and the hub. Drive again. Then do the other rear hub area. You'll get a very clear audio picture of what it is. And you'll laugh and say "No way am I hearing this. Unbelievable." under your breath while driving.

A hose transmits sound eerily well. Generations of Dads (my hand is up) slid one end under the tent in the backyard at night when the kids had sleepovers, and made wolf sounds, etc, plus in the Navy they used "speaking tubes" hundreds of feet long to talk to various parts of the ship if you need references on how long mankind has known this. It works great. Extra points if you simultaneously install 3 sections of hose and drive around listening to them. The neighbors won't invite you to the annual barbecue, though.

Seriously, all humor aside I have done this with laughably easy results and I keep the cut chunks of hose coiled under the workbench. The best setup is if you can get the entire end of the hose in contact against the diff/hub/suspect component, and held firmly against it. Zip ties, duct tape, all come into play.

Wait up guys

i did not see this post

i definitely believe I will be trying the hose method its so simple its genius

The only reason why i didn't use my manual stethoscope while the car was in the air was i felt uncomfortable getting under the car whilst wheels are moving at around 25mph etc
 

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Diff. bearings can howl on cruise/Accel/decel does not matter.

Howling noise is bearing for sure, you just need to pinpoint which ones.

Sometimes cornering while driving can indicate at least which side is the likely culprit with wheel bearings.
Shift the weight to the side that's bad, howling should get worse, lift the weight off should get quieter.

You have to pinpoint where the noise is originating, we can only speculate from here.
 
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